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June 13, 2018

From the Mind Behind ‘The End of the F***ing World’ Comes ‘KAOS’

Netflix just signed on for an exciting new show by the talented Charlie Covell.

When Netflix unleashed The End of the F***ing World onto its viewers, they couldn’t have anticipated the response it would get, with fans already clamoring for the second season after just eight episodes. Viewers were obviously entranced by the dark humor and twist on the typical teenage runaway story. The intensity of the journey of a potentially psychopathic boy and his paradoxically lovestruck companion, make it the must-see of this year’s streaming roster.

Even stronger than the story itself, though, is series creator Charlie Covell’s writing of the adaptation, which is based on the off-kilter graphic novel by Charles Forsman. This could not have been more apparent than by Netflix’s decision to bring Covell in on a brand new series akin to The End of the F****** World’s darker comedic tones.

An actress, writer, and producer, Covell is quickly becoming the triple threat Netflix has been searching for all along. According to Variety, the entertainment giant announced it would be picking up 10 episodes of Covell’s KAOS, an original new scripted series involving a “contemporary reimagining of Greek mythology” that will “explore themes of gender politics, power, and life in the underworld.”

This description is already a powerhouse of a series logline. One can only imagine the possibilities introduced when Greek mythology and gender discourse come into play. Add that to a solid writing foundation and a creative mind with a knack for satire and you’ve got one hell of a concept.

The utilization of Ancient Greek mythos in and of itself is enough to turn heads, as the subject has historically had high cinematic potential. However, the possibility of seeing the gods and goddesses of old brought to life under a comedic pen truly sweetens the pot.

There are simply so many avenues Covell could choose to take with this subject. Will these be modern-day depictions of mythological figures in today’s world? Or will we be given a more archaic setting, but with these modern themes serving as great juxtaposition?

The mentioning of the underworld in particular raises one’s eyebrows as to which mythological figures may be featured at the center of KAOS. Hades comes to mind immediately, which could bring the tragic character of Persephone to the small screen as well. No doubt her abduction into the underworld would be the perfect story with which to surround a discussion of gender.

Ancient Greece’s own history with gender and sexuality presents a huge opportunity when looking at power dynamics in Ancient Greek life, specifically the more dominant role of men in both the time period and the mythology (anyone who knows Zeus’s track record will agree.) The subjugation of women is certainly a less enticing piece of history but it is one which KAOS could attempt to subvert — or even show in a way that gives women of the time a voice.

As for discussions of sexuality that arise from gender politics, it goes without saying that homosexuality was essentially commonplace in Ancient Greek civilization, making an appearance in at least in theme and subtext in the mythology as well. Following this line of thought, the story of Achilles and Patroclus would make a perfect point of interest for KAOS.

Needless to say, fans of The End of the F****** World (including us here at FSR) are in for a treat, and at the very least have something to look forward to while they wait for the always-nebulous Season 2. As for viewers unfamiliar with Covell’s work, KAOS sounds like the perfect introduction into her web of wonderfully black humor and unique style.

We will definitely be keeping a close eye on this one, hoping Covell is able to balance the romantic, pomegranate-stained philosophies of Greek mythology with the grim (yet immensely funny) look at human nature we’ve come to anticipate from her.

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